Rural Sovereignty Grants

Rural Sovereignty Grants

Grant funds available: $150,000

Application opening date: Thursday, June 14, 2018

Application closing date: Friday, August 1, 2018

Please submit applications to:

Public Lands Policy Coordinating Office
Attention Kathleen Clarke

5110 State Office Building

Salt Lake City, UT 84114-1107

or email to kathleenclarke@utah.gov

 

The Public Lands Policy Coordinating Office (PLPCO) received $150,000.00 last year in an appropriation from the Legislature to be used for Rural Sovereignty Grants.

The Legislature intended the funds be used as a grant program to support rural Utah counties and initiatives challenging federal restrictions and actions that prohibit or harm resource use, access, and development on public (federal) lands. PLPCO would like to invite counties in Utah to submit a proposal and statement of need to apply for these funds.

PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

The proposal must identify specific initiatives and efforts the county intends to bring to challenge federal restrictions and actions that prohibit or harm resource use, access, and development on public (federal) lands.  The proposal should include:

1)  A proposed Scope of Work;

2)  Draft budget identifying specific funding needs;

3)  A proposed time line for using the funds;

4)  Deliverables;

5)  Responsible party;

6)  Any other information the county, or its representative, deems essential to assist PLPCO in                           determining a county’s qualification for receipt of grant funds.

The proposal must be sent via email to Kathleen Clarke at kathleenclarke@utah.gov or via U.S. Mail to:

 

Public Lands Policy Coordinating Office

Attention Kathleen Clarke

5110 State Office Building

Salt Lake City, UT 84114

 

The deadline for applying for all or a portion of the grant funds is Friday, August 1, 2018 before 5:00 p.m.

EVALUATION CRITERIA

After the deadline is closed, a selection committee will evaluate the applications. Applications will be evaluated using the following criteria:

  • County initiative contains measurable goals and objectives that will result in a challenge to federal restrictions and actions that prohibit or harm resource use, access, and development on public (federal) lands in or around that county;
  • Likelihood that initiative challenging federal restrictions and actions will be successful or result in policy or legal change;
  • Budget- County must submit a complete budget identifying concrete funding needs;
  • Percentage of public land in county seeking funds;
  • County, or its representatives, expertise, competence, and experience challenging federal restrictions and actions that prohibit or harm resource use, access, and development on public (federal) lands in or around that county.

REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

The grant recipient will provide the State Auditor’s Office with the following accounting for all State Money received under this grant:

a) a written description and an itemized report detailing the expenditure of the State Money or the intended expenditure of any State Money that has not been spent; and

b) a final written itemized report when all the State Money is spent.

c) The reports referenced in (a) and (b) shall be provided at least annually, and no later than 60 days after all of the State Money is spent.

d) If the Grantee is a non-profit corporation, Grantee shall annually disclose whether:  (i) the nonprofit corporation met or exceeded the dollar amounts listed in Utah Code Section 51-2a- 201.5 in the previous fiscal year of the nonprofit corporation; or (ii) the nonprofit corporation anticipates meeting or exceeding the dollar amounts listed in Utah Code Section 51-2a- 201.5 in the fiscal year the money is disbursed.

e) Required financial reporting to the State Auditor’s Office depending on the amount of the appropriation; this be including any financial disclosures, or formal audits per the State Auditor’s Office.

 

If you have any questions regarding the Rural Sovereignty Grants, please contact Braden Sheppard at bsheppard@utah.gov or at (801) 537-9801.

We look forward to working with counties and their representatives with this grant program.

 


 

 

 

Utah Granted Intervention in Coal Leasing Case

A Utah District Court granted the State of Utah’s motion to intervene in a lawsuit involving a coal lease application in Sanpete County. The lease, which will allow mining in the Flat Canyon tract, an adjacent property to Skyline Mine, was approved by the Bureau of Land Management in 2015 and later challenged by WildEarth Guardians and Grand Canyon Trust.  While the merits of the case have yet to be determined, District Court Judge David Nuffer concluded that Utah’s interest in the outcome was sufficient to grant the state intervener status.

Skyline Mine employs approximately 240 people, and in 2015 contributed approximately $4.75 million in revenue for Utah

The ultimate ruling in the case will have serious implications for the state. According to the United States Energy Information Administration, Skyline Mine employs approximately 240 people, and in 2015 contributed approximately $4.75 million in revenue for Utah. The Flat Canyon Lease would extend the life of the mine and therefore provide a continued source of revenue and jobs. Based on the significance of this information the Court concluded, “Utah’s expected revenue from the Skyline Mine’s expansion into the Flat Canyon lease is an economic interest meriting intervener status”.

In addition to the economic stakes, the Court also acknowledged Utah’s sovereign regulatory responsibility. The State has an independent interest in making sure coal mining is conducted in an environmentally responsible way. State approval, which may include an independent environmental analysis, is therefore a pre-requisite to federal approval of all coal mining leases. Because, as Judge Nuffer explained, the federal and state roles in granting coal leasing permits are “intertwined,” the state must be able to speak for itself in defending this particular lease in Flat Canyon tract.

As an intervener, Utah will have standing to coordinate with the Federal Defendants in making official filings in the case. The Court placed no other limitations on its intervener status.

Grazing Working Group

Uncertainty Plain

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Richfield-Sevier Valley Center at Snow College

800 West 200 South, Richfield, UT 84701

The Grazing Rights Conference hosted by the Utah Farm Bureau Federation is being held Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 9:00 AM. The conference is being held at the Richfield-Sevier Valley Center at Snow College in Richfield. There will be multiple panel discussion by both Utah’s Public Lands Policy Coordinating Office and Utah Department of Agriculture and Food.

Download Handouts

 

Judge Finds Deficiencies in Richfield RMP

Brian Maffly | Salt Lake Tribune

“A federal judge has ordered the Bureau of Land Management to document that its designation of a 4,377-mile network of motorized routes in central Utah will not harm wildlife and archaeological resources.

The order that U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball issued Friday spells out the “remedy” needed to address deficiencies he found in the BLM’s Richfield resource management plan (RMP) in 2013. The agency has three years to conduct new analyses of the routes in its travel plan, a component of the larger document.

BLM’s Richfield RMP covers 2.1 million acres in Sevier, Garfield, Wayne and Piute counties — a scenic area bounded by Capitol Reef and Canyonlands national parks, extending north up the Sevier Valley and encompassing the Henry Mountains, Factory Butte, the Dirty Devil River and Muddy Creek, among other notable landscapes.”

To read more of this article, click here.

To read Judge Kimball’s decision, click here.